image2

Building Calgary Communities

Building Calgary Communities (BCC) is a speaker series jointly offered by Chinook Country Historical Society (CCHS) and the Calgary Association of Lifelong Learners (CALL). In this series, we explore the pioneers that came to Calgary to build a new life while enriching our city with the culture of their homeland.


Our objective is to highlight the individuals from these communities that brought their pioneering spirit along with their traditions and beliefs. Why did they come here? What have they contributed to our community? How did they make it easier for others to follow in their footsteps? What imprint has this community left on our city and province?



The events are held at cSPACE King Edward at 1721 29 Avenue S.W. on the first Friday of each month, with the exception of January, July, August and September.


The events are free for CCHS and CALL members, $5 charge at door for non-members. No registration required.

image3

Events

4 October 2019

Dolly's Calgary / Philippines Story

1 pm

cSpace King Edward 1721 -29 Avenue SW Members Free; Non-members $5

Event Details

4 October 2019

Dolly's Calgary / Philippines Story

Dolly Castillo

  

Maria Dolores Punsalan Castillo, or Dolly for short, came to Canada from the Philippines 43 years ago. After working for 4 years in Toronto, she has made her home in Calgary for the past 39 years. 


A college English teacher and librarian in her birth country, Dolly worked at York University and University of Toronto as a library assistant, and in Calgary as a senior information management analyst with several oil and gas companies. 


Widowed 7 years ago and retired for the last 9 years, life is still full and fulfilling with volunteer work : church, family, community associations, and school. Dolly is an active retiree. 


Sharing and mentoring, both formal and informal, are her mantra and lifelong goals.  Dolly shares her perspective in her storytelling; unique immigration stories of fellow countrymen will be shared. Dolly is looking forward to sharing the Calgary/Philippines story.

1 pm

cSpace King Edward 1721 -29 Avenue SW Members Free; Non-members $5

1 November 2019

Syrian Refugee Support Group

1 pm

cSpace King Edward 1721 -29 Avenue SW Members Free; Non-members $5

Event Details

1 November 2019

Syrian Refugee Support Group

Sam Nammoura and Saima Jamal


The Calgary Immigrant Support Society is a citizens action driven group of community volunteers from all walks of life, with various origins and beliefs.  Their goal is to make Calgary a welcoming place for refugees and newcomers from all backgrounds; a goal that was inspired by the Syrian refugee crisis.  The organization’s co-founders, Sam Nammoura and Saima Jamal will share refugee stories, and talk about how their work creates reciprocal benefits for everyone in the community.  Listen how through meaningful, personal interactions, the fears we hold of “the other” evaporate.

1 pm

cSpace King Edward 1721 -29 Avenue SW Members Free; Non-members $5

6 December 2019

Calgary's LGBTQ2SA+ Communities

1 pm

cSpace King Edward 1721 -29 Avenue SW Members Free; Non-members $5

Event Details

6 December 2019

Calgary's LGBTQ2SA+ Communities

Kevin Allen


Join Kevin Allen, author of Our Past Matters Stories of Gay Calgary, for an exploration of the city's little known LGBTQ2 History.  Learn about Everett Klippert, the Calgary Bus Driver whose Supreme Court case led to the partial decriminalization of homosexuality in 1969.  Hear about community organizers who founded the city’s first gay clubs and safe spaces, including the legendary Club Carousel.  Kevin will share gay tales ranging from the signing of Treaty 7 to debates within the queer community today.


Kevin Allen has been documenting and profiling queer people and events for 25+ years through freelance writing and editing for various queer publications.  His book, Our Past Matters Stories of Gay Calgary, launched at the New Central Library in November 2018, where he was the inaugural Historian in Residence.  John Ibbitson, from the Globe and Mail, wrote: "This is a Calgary everyone should get to know. There’s no one better equipped than Kevin Allen to give us a tour.”

1 pm

cSpace King Edward 1721 -29 Avenue SW Members Free; Non-members $5

7 February 2020

Calgary's Czech Community

7pm - 10pm

cSpace King Edward 1721 -29 Avenue SW Members Free; Non-members $5

Event Details

7 February 2020

Calgary's Czech Community

Lubos (Lou) Pesta


Details coming soon.

7pm - 10pm

cSpace King Edward 1721 -29 Avenue SW Members Free; Non-members $5

6 March 2020

Calgary's Jewish Community - Part 2

1 pm

cSpace King Edward 1721 -29 Avenue SW Members Free; Non-members $5

Event Details

6 March 2020

Calgary's Jewish Community - Part 2

Harry Sanders


Details coming soon.

1 pm

cSpace King Edward 1721 -29 Avenue SW Members Free; Non-members $5

More Events

2018-2019 Series

 October 5, 2018 

Sikhs Settlers and Sojourners 

Dr. Michael Hawley, Mount Royal University.

Sikhs Settlers and Sojourners is an introduction to the Sikh pioneers who made their way to southern Alberta in the early part of the 20th century.  Sikhs have settled here for over a century.  Yet their story has been overlooked and largely undocumented … until now.  This presentation offers a glimpse into some of the documents, photographs, and personalities of early Sikh arrivals in the province.


November 2, 2018

Secrets of Calgary’s Chinatown

Alice Lam, Michael Lee, Patrick Teoh

How did Calgary’s Chinatown get here? It took years of hard work, collaboration and perseverance. Facing many different roadblocks, come to listen to how the Chinesse community overcame barriers and developed what is know as Calgary’s 3rd Chinatown and how many groups in Chinatown are working hard to ensure it legacy is preserved for years to come.


December 7, 2018

New Immigrant Stories

Rebeca Andrada, Outreach Coordinator with Immigrant Services Calgary

People have been settling in Calgary for almost 150 years.  For over 40 years Immigrant Services Calgary has been providing a wide range of settlement services to immigrants and refugees looking to begin a new chapter of their lives in Canada. Come hear more about the agency and the individuals and families it serves.  Listen to the stories of some of Calgary’s newest immigrants.
 

Rebeca Andrada, Outreach Coordinator with Immigrant Services Calgary, will talk about the history of her agency, describe the services available to immigrants and refugees and explain how the system works.  She’ll bring recent clients who will tell their stories of coming to Calgary, of seeking a new beginning and of making a better life for themselves.


February 1, 2019

Rouleauville - Calgary’s Francophone Roots

Suzanne de Courville Nicol

Meet the “Significant Seven”, Calgary’s French Pioneering Trailblazers 

Alberta’s francophone roots date back to 1795 when French predominated at Fort Edmonton, constructed by the Hudson’s Bay Company. The Saint-Joachim Catholic Parish was first established in 1838 in Fort Edmonton.

Today, Alberta has one of the fastest growing francophone populations in Canada and has the third largest francophone population outside Québec, after Ontario and New Brunswick. 

In 1872, la Mission Notre-Dame-de-la-Paix (Our Lady of Peace Mission), built west of Calgary, began as a crude log cabin surmounted by a cross, the first Catholic church built by Métis lay helper Alexis Cardinal. In 1873 it was established as la Mission Notre-Dame-de-la-Paix by Father Constantine Scollen,O.M.I. Father Léon Doucet, O.M.I. joined him in 1875 and went on to Notre-Dame-des-Prairies (Bow River) on May 18th. He was the first white man to set up a tent at the mouth of the Bow and Elbow Rivers (Calgary) where a stockade would be built. Six months later, it was named Fort Brisebois only to be re-named Fort Calgary in 1876. 

Thus began the battle for survival of the French presence, language and culture, on all fronts in Calgary. “Rouleauville”, Calgary’s historic French Quarter (1899 to 1907) was seemingly destined to disappear forever … until the early 1990’s, when the “stars aligned” and the French Finger of Fate pointed to the past and attracted a network of fact-finders.

Join Suzanne de Courville Nicol, Calgary’s francophone community advocate and Rouleauville history researcher-educator and promoter since 1989, to learn about exciting discoveries related to Rouleauville. 

Known as “Madame FRANCO-FUN CALGARY” for the multiple FUN bilingual community events she has organized since 1994, make no mistake, Suzanne is very serious about all matters pertaining to Calgary’s French history and heritage. She will bring the “Significant Seven” Calgary’s French Pioneering trailblazers to life, as she talks about these unsung heroes. She will leave you shaking your head in amazement, and make you want to know more about “Rouleauville”, the Cradle of Calgary.


March 1, 2019

The History of Calgary’s Jewish Community

Harry Sanders, Historian

Like other Calgarians of diverse backgrounds, Jews have made notable contributions to city life.  Though no more than two per cent of Calgary's population at its peak (one in 50 Calgarians was Jewish in the 1921 and 1941 census years), the community and its members have engaged as fully as possible with the broader population through business, arts and culture, military service, politics, public school, and membership in service organizations.  Join historian Harry Sanders, a board member of the Jewish Historical Society of Southern Alberta, for an illustrated talk on the history of Jewish Calgary. 


April 5, 2019

Italian Immigration to Calgary, 1900 - 1970
Antonella Fanella 

Italians came to Calgary and Alberta in three main waves, pre-WWI, post WWI and post WWII. The presentation will look at where the immigrants came from, why they came, where they settled and how they contributed to the history of Calgary.
 

May 3, 2019

Calgary’s German Russian Community
Marlene Michel

Who are the Germans from Russia? Germans started moving to Russia beginning with the reign of Ivan the Terrible (1533-1584). The biggest influx began at the invitation of Catherine the Great in 1763.

After Catherine the Great died their circumstances drastically changed and many began looking for a better place to live

This presentation will look at how the Germans from Russia found out about the Canadian West, how and why they came to Calgary and specifically Bridgeland / Riverside. They came in large numbers during the early 1900s (approximately 188,000 between 1904 and 1914). What kinds of businesses were they involved in? How has this ethnic group positively impacted Calgary and area?

image4